Why Adnan Syed Was Released From Prison (2023)

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michael barbaro

From “The New York Times,” I’m Michael Barbaro. This is “The Daily.”

Yesterday, Adnan Syed was released from prison. You knew his story. It was the subject of the first season of the podcast “Serial,” which painstakingly examined his case and the evidence used against him. Syed was accused of killing his classmate and ex-girlfriend, Hae Min Lee, whose body was found buried in a park in Baltimore. He was convicted and sentenced to life but has proclaimed his innocence for the last 23 years.

It was a stunning development. And my colleague, “Serial” host Sarah Koenig, was in court watching it unfold, and tells the story of why it happened. It’s Tuesday, September 20.

[MUSIC PLAYING]

archived recording 1

This is a global Tel Link prepaid call from —

adnan syed

Adnan Syed.

archived recording 1

— an inmate at a Maryland Correctional facility. This call will be recorded and monitored.

archived recording 2

There is a major development in a case intimately explored in the hit podcast —

archived recording 3

A stunning reversal. Baltimore state’s attorney presenting new evidence of two other possible suspects.

archived recording 4

And what this all means is that after decades behind bars, Adnan could be released from prison.

[MUSIC PLAYING]

sarah koenig

Adnan Syed got out of prison yesterday. It was extraordinary. The whole thing. Here’s his attorney Erica Suter.

archived recording (erica suter)

Today, my friend and client Adnan Syed walks free for the first time in 23 years.

sarah koenig

On Wednesday of last week, city prosecutors filed a motion saying they could no longer stand behind the murder case they built against Adnan. They were asking a judge to vacate the conviction. Five days later, Adnan was out — on home detention for now, but out, home.

archived recording (marilyn mosby)

Good afternoon. God is good. Since the inception of —

sarah koenig

Marilyn Mosby, Baltimore state’s attorney, started to give a statement to the dozens of TV cameras and microphones massed on the sidewalk outside the courthouse.

(Video) Serial podcast's Adnan Syed released from prison | ABC News

archived recording (marilyn mosby)

The public must know that the justice —

[CHEERING]

The justice —

sarah koenig

But she couldn’t compete with the mayhem when Adnan finally walked out.

[CHEERING]

From the people who’ve been arguing for his release, some of them for decades, the pent up strain of years’ worth of rage and frustration suddenly loosed on the sidewalk, spilling onto Calvert Street.

archived recording 5

How do you feel, man?

sarah koenig

Adnan didn’t say a word, just kept his cool while sheriff’s deputies hurried him through the scrum and into a white van.

Adnan and I have talked on and off over the years. More recently, it seemed like he was trying to tamp down his hopes, not get ahead of himself. A couple of his old attorneys, though, the guys who tried to get him out on bail when he was 17, I caught them out on the sidewalk hugging.

speaker 1

(SOBBING) [INAUDIBLE]

I don’t know. I coudln’t.

sarah koenig

I was in the courtroom for the hearing — more than 100 people, at times shockingly quiet as if no one was breathing. At the beginning, Young Lee, the brother of Hae Min Lee, whose murder was about to be unsolved, spoke via Zoom directly to Judge Melissa Phinn. Young Lee tried to keep it together, but he couldn’t. “When I think it’s over, he said, it always comes back, a real life living nightmare for 20-plus years.” But he also told the judge he believes in the justice system. He’s not against a new investigation. He said to Judge Phinn, “make the right decision.”

Then the prosecutor read the highlights of her motion into the record. Adnan’s lawyer made a brief statement. And within about 40 minutes, the judge was ready with her decision. “On this 19th day of September, 2022,” she said, “in the interest of justice, the motion to vacate is hereby granted.”

[MUSIC PLAYING]

You might be asking what on Earth happened. I’ve spent the last few days trying to understand it myself, wherefore this motion to vacate that burst like a firework out of the prosecutor’s office, the very same office that asked the jury in 1999 to, quote, “come back with a guilty finding for first degree premeditated murder by the defendant, Adnan Syed.”

The prosecutors today are not saying Adnan is innocent. They stopped short of exonerating him. Instead, they’re saying that back in 1999, we didn’t investigate this case thoroughly enough. We relied on evidence we shouldn’t have, and we broke the rules when we prosecuted. This wasn’t an honest conviction.

According to the prosecutor’s office, they didn’t set out to pick apart Adnan’s case — their own case, mind you. They say it just kind of crumbled once they took a hard look. I know. If you’ve heard season 1 of “Serial,” you know how I got there. Here’s how they got there.

(Video) ‘Serial’ Podcast’s #AdnanSyed Freed From Prison

Almost a year ago, a new law took effect in Maryland, the Juvenile Restoration Act. One of the things the law says is that if you’ve served at least 20 years in prison for a crime committed when you were a juvenile, you can ask the court to reduce your sentence, maybe even let you out. So the day after this new law comes into effect on October 2, 2021, Adnan’s current attorney Erica Suter delivers his case over to the Baltimore City state’s attorney’s office for them to look at. Because, if you remember, Adnan was only 17 when he was arrested for killing Hae Min Lee, his classmate and former girlfriend.

This request goes to Becky Feldman, chief of the sentencing review unit for the prosecutor’s office. One of the factors she has to weigh in deciding whether to support a sentence reduction under this new law is the facts of the crime. So Becky Feldman starts reading, and pretty soon she’s bothered. Something isn’t right with the case. She’s having a hard time answering what should be a simple question. What’s Adnan Syed’s level of culpability in this crime?

Becky Feldman is pretty new to the prosecutor’s office, pretty new to being a prosecutor. She’d been high up at the public defender’s office for years. Her sense of alarm was cultivated on the defense side.

The sentence review isn’t supposed to be a reinvestigation of a case, but that’s what starts rolling. By March, Becky’s office, joined by Adnan’s lawyer, asks a judge to order new high-tech DNA testing. That takes a while to work through the system. So while they wait, Becky and Erica Suter work together, pulling threads. Becky’s office consults cellphone experts, a polygraph expert. She’s all up inside Google Maps and land records.

The state’s massive case file is over at the attorney general’s office a few blocks away. Becky starts hoofing it over there in June. The AG’s office is like, 17 boxes of case materials, here’s a copy machine, knock yourself out. She copies a bunch of stuff from the first seven boxes, takes the papers back to her office to read, and that’s when she discovers some handwritten notes. They’re messy, hard to make out. But once she deciphers the writing, she realizes these notes are about a potential alternate suspect in the case. She calls up Erica Suter, who tells her, yeah, we’ve never seen these notes before. They’re both shocked.

Once the DNA results came back in mid-August with nothing really conclusive or useful, they took stock of everything they’d learned. The result was a disturbing bouquet of problems whose cumulative effect gave the state, quote, “overwhelming cause for concern.” Under the circumstances, they couldn’t justify holding Adnan in prison anymore. So Becky Feldman wrote a motion to the court, a motion to vacate.

The motion to vacate does not tell us a new story of the crime, doesn’t lay out an alternate theory of who killed Hae Min Lee. Instead, the motion lays out how the system malfunctioned back then and how little we know now.

The headline of the state’s motion is that they’ve developed more evidence about two people who might have been involved in the crime but whom they say weren’t properly ruled out as suspects. They don’t name these people. They just call them the suspect, or the suspects, because they say the investigation is ongoing. They might have been involved together or separately. They don’t know. But both were known to detectives at the time.

The first thing and worst thing they list about these possible suspects, those handwritten notes Becky Feldman found in the state’s trial boxes. They appear to be written by a prosecutor memorializing two different phone calls from different people who called the state’s attorney’s office to give information about the same person. The notes aren’t dated. But as best as Becky can tell, the calls came in several months apart and before Adnan was tried.

The gist of the information from both calls is that a guy the state had more or less overlooked had a motive to kill Hae Min Lee, that this person was heard saying that he was upset with her, and that he would quote, “Make her disappear. He would kill her,” unquote.

In court yesterday, Becky said the state had looked into this individual, and found the information in those handwritten notes to be credible, that the suspect had the, quote, “motive, opportunity, and means to commit the crime.” Whether he did or he didn’t though, legally speaking, this would be a major breach. If they failed to turn over evidence like this to the defense, that’s known as a Brady violation. And that’s what’s so alarms Becky Feldman, that it looks like Adnan’s lawyers never knew about these calls. That alone could be cause to overturn Adnan’s conviction.

So that’s the biggest problem the motion explains, this Brady violation regarding one of the two alternate suspects the prosecutors are not naming. And the motion says they’ve also got other new information about these two suspects. One of them had a connection to the location where Hae Min Lee’s car was found after she disappeared. One or both of them have relevant criminal histories, mostly crimes committed after Adnan’s trial, one of them for a series of sexual assaults.

I know who these suspects are. One of them was investigated at the time, submitted to a couple of polygraphs. The other was investigated also, but not with much vigor, as far as I can tell. He’s now in prison for sexual assault. But no one has charged either of these guys in connection with Hae Min Lee’s murder, so I’m not going to name them either.

That’s all the new information they found about the case. But, the motion continues, they also looked at the old information. And now they’re saying they’ve lost faith in that too. They don’t trust the state’s main evidence at trial — the testimony of their star witness, Jay Wilds, and the cellphone records. They don’t hold up separately. They don’t hold up together.

If you listened to our show, you probably remember all this. Jay was a friend of Adnan’s who told the cops that Adnan said he was going to kill Hae, and that after he did it, he showed Jay her body in the trunk of a car and then coerced Jay into helping bury her in a wooded city park. The motion explains, as many people have before, that the details of Jay’s story kept changing. Becky Feldman points to one glaring example — the location where Jay says Adnan first showed him Hae’s body. In his first taped interview with the detectives, Jay tells them he met up with Adnan somewhere along Edmondson Avenue, and that’s when he sees Hae’s body in the trunk.

archived recording (jay wilds)

I went to pick him up from off of Edmondson Avenue at a strip, and he popped the trunk open. And —

archived recording 6

When you say on Edmondson Avenue, off of the strip, do you recall any cross streets on Edmondson Avenue where you go to meet him?

(Video) Serial’s Adnan Syed Freed from Prison & TikTok’s NyQuil Chicken Craze | The Daily Show

archived recording (jay wilds)

I don’t know them by name, but I could tell it to you by sight.

sarah koenig

A couple of weeks later, Jay tells the cops he met up with Adnan and saw Hae’s body in a different spot.

archived recording 7

And while en route to your house, you received a phone call from Adnan —

archived recording (jay wilds)

Yes.

archived recording 7

— on his cell phone —

archived recording (jay wilds)

Yes.

archived recording 7

— which in your possession.

archived recording (jay wilds)

Yes.

archived recording 7

And the conversation was what?

archived recording (jay wilds)

That bitch is dead. Come and get me. I’m at that spot.

sarah koenig

And Jay’s story has gotten even more confusing in the years since the trial. The motion notes that Jay told a reporter — not me — back in 2014 that he’d been out in front of his grandmother’s house when Adnan came by and popped the trunk. At the trial, prosecutors kept saying to the jury, we know he’s not the greatest witness.

lisa flynn

I do remember that when we first heard his testimony that we were all skeptical. Like, who is this guy? And where did he come from?

sarah koenig

That’s a juror named Lisa Flynn. The prosecutors were telling the jury, don’t worry, you don’t have to rely on his testimony alone. Because what he’s saying is corroborated by the cellphone records. Cellphone evidence was crucial to the state’s case. It underpinned Jay’s testimony about what happened that night, where they went, whom they spoke to. It glued together the timeline. The cellphone evidence helped clear up the shagginess of Jay’s story.

lisa flynn

It was after hearing the other testimony and then seeing the records and the cellphone records, knowing that, OK, so even if he had lied, testimony proved that he was at this place at this time.

sarah koenig

But Becky Feldman wrote in last week’s motion that the cellphone evidence at trial, it was unreliable. Adnan’s defense team has been saying this for years, but the state only recently talked to three experts about what the cell records actually show and don’t show. And the experts all agreed — you can’t use the incoming call records to back up Jay’s narrative. It doesn’t work like that for a host of reasons I won’t bore you with. We didn’t get to the bottom of this incoming call problem back when we were reporting this story.

At the end of the motion, Becky Feldman tacked on a, by the way, final section about one of the two main detectives on the case, Bill Ritz. He was accused of misconduct in another murder case that went to trial the same year Adnan did. In that case, Detective Ritz was accused of manipulating evidence, fabricating evidence, not disclosing exculpatory evidence, not following up on evidence that pointed to a different suspect. In 2016, the guy convicted in that case was exonerated. Ritz was one of the two detectives who repeatedly interviewed Jay Wilds.

[DISTORTED MUSIC]

(Video) Man Accused of Killing Hae Min Lee Released from Prison | Update of Adnan Syed Case

So that’s the bulk of the state’s motion to vacate — new information about two potential suspects, important evidence withheld from the defense, renewed suspicion of Jay’s story, loss of confidence in the cellphone evidence. And while the Brady violation alone is enough for the state to cry uncle, all of it together, well, yes, overwhelming cause for concern. Adnan’s case was a mess, is a mess. That’s pretty much where we were when we stopped reporting in 2014.

Baltimore City Police have told the prosecutor’s office they’re going to put someone back on the case. Someone will try to talk to the two suspects Becky identified in the motion. I have zero predictions about what could come of that. But I do know that the chances of the state ever trying to prosecute Adnan again are remote at best.

[MUSIC PLAYING]

When Rabia Chaudry first came to me about this case, I hadn’t heard of it. No other journalists were looking at it. Most of the reporting I did was to try to find out, obviously, who killed this young woman, but also, if everyone’s doing their job right, how does a kid get convicted on evidence this shaky? In the years since our story first aired, Rabia and others have pushed to find out more.

Now here come city prosecutors, and they’re going even further. And the picture that’s emerged is this. Adnan’s case contains just about every chronic problem our system can cough up — police using questionable interview methods, prosecutors keeping crucial evidence from the defense, slightly junky science, extreme prison sentences, juveniles treated as adults, how grindingly difficult it is to get your case back in court once you’ve been convicted.

The Baltimore courtroom where Adnan’s hearing was held is an old school architectural gem. You sit there hoping the massive chandelier is well secured. The soaring ceilings are meant to inspire soaring thoughts, about justice, presumably, and fairness.

Yesterday, there was a lot of talk about fairness. But most of what the state put in that motion to vacate, all the actual evidence, was either known or knowable to cops and prosecutors back in 1999. So even on a day when the government publicly recognizes its own mistakes, it’s hard to feel cheered about a triumph of fairness because we’ve built a system that takes more than 20 years to self-correct. And that’s just this one case.

[MUSIC PLAYING]

michael barbaro

Here’s what else you need to know today. After knocking out the electricity in Puerto Rico, Hurricane Fiona subjected the island to unrelenting rain and terrifying flash floods on Monday. Over the past two days, more than 30 inches of rain have fallen in some parts of Puerto Rico, requiring the emergency rescue of about 1,000 people. And —

^archived recording (choir)

(SINGING) — resurrection and the light, sayeth the Lord.

michael barbaro

— Queen Elizabeth II was laid to rest on Monday after a majestic state funeral that drew tens of millions of Britons together in a vast expression of grief and gratitude.

^archived recording (justin welby)

Her late majesty famously declared on her 21st birthday broadcast that her whole life would be dedicated to serving the nation and commonwealth. Rarely has such a promise been so well kept.

michael barbaro

After a eulogy from the Archbishop of Canterbury, the queen’s coffin was lowered into the royal vault next to her late husband, Prince Philip, inside a chapel at Windsor Castle.

^archived recording (choir)

(SINGING) — shall never, shall never die.

[BAGPIPES PLAYING LAMENT]

Moments later, a lone bagpiper paid tribute to the queen.

[BAGPIPES PLAYING LAMENT]

(Video) How Adnan Syed Was Released From Prison

That’s it for “The Daily.” I’m Michael Barbaro. See you tomorrow.

FAQs

Why was Adnan Syed released? ›

BALTIMORE (AP) — A Baltimore judge on Monday ordered the release of Adnan Syed after overturning Syed's conviction for the 1999 murder of high school student Hae Min Lee — a case that was chronicled in the hit podcast “Serial,” a true-crime series that transfixed listeners and revolutionized the genre.

Is Adnan Syed going to be released? ›

Adnan Syed, subject of 'Serial' podcast, is released after his conviction is vacated. But prosecutors kept information about alternative suspects from defense attorneys, according to a motion to vacate the conviction filed by prosecutors.

Is Adnan Syed innocent? ›

He was convicted and sentenced to life in prison but has proclaimed his innocence for the last 23 years. Mr. Syed was the subject of the first season of the podcast “Serial,” which painstakingly examined his case and the evidence against him. Yesterday, his conviction was overturned.

How long was Adnan sentenced? ›

Lee's ex-boyfriend, Adnan Masud Syed (born May 21, 1981), was initially convicted of first-degree murder and sentenced to life in prison plus 30 years. In 2014, the podcast Serial covered the killing, which brought renewed attention to the case.

Why did Hae break up with Adnan? ›

1998: Hae Min Lee and Adnan Syed Break Up

After keeping their romance a secret due to religious and cultural differences, Hae Min Lee, 18, and Adnan Syed, 17, who were classmates at Woodlawn High School in Baltimore, break up. Both attended the magnet program at Woodlawn, for high-achieving students.

Is Adnan Syed free? ›

Adnan had been out of prison, on home detention, since September 19, when a judge granted the state's motion to vacate his conviction.

What was Adnan Syed charged with? ›

In 2000, a jury convicted Mr. Syed, who was 17 at the time of Ms. Lee's death, of first-degree murder, robbery, kidnapping and false imprisonment. The podcast “Serial” chronicled the case in its first season and became a pop culture sensation that attracted renewed interest in the prosecution of Mr.

Who is Adnan's mother? ›

What are some reasons why Adnan is innocent? ›

Adnan Syed is innocent of killing Hae-Min Lee because of three reasons: Cristina Gutierrez, Adnan's lawyer, failed to put him in a position to win the trial, Jay is not an effective witness, and the window of time does not match up.

Who is Adnan Syed's lawyer? ›

It's Midday on the Law. On Monday, Adnan Syed was released from prison and allowed to go home, with a GPS monitor, after 23 years behind bars. His conviction for murdering Hae-Min Lee in 1999 was vacated.

When did serial come out? ›

October 3, 2014

What is the status of Adnan Syed case? ›

Baltimore prosecutors on Tuesday dropped the charges against Adnan Syed, who was released from prison last month after he spent 23 years in prison fighting a murder conviction that was chronicled in the hit podcast “Serial.”

How old was Adnan? ›

After 23 years behind bars, Adnan Syed is a free man. On Tuesday, prosecutors dropped the charges against the 41-year-old from Baltimore, who was found guilty of murdering his ex-girlfriend Hae Min Lee back in 1999. He was released last month after Baltimore Circuit Judge Melissa Phinn overturned his conviction.

What nationality is Adnan Syed? ›

Was Adnan upset about the breakup? ›

Both of them, but especially Adnan, were under special pressure at home, and the stress of that spilled over into their relationship. Eventually Hae broke up with Adnan. And then, depending on who you ask, Adnan was either understandably sad and moping around, or full of rage and plotting to kill her.

What did the prosecution say the break up was about for Adnan? ›

However, their relationship was a secret due to their parents' culture. The prosecution also describes Adnan as a betrayer of his family and religion to be with her and it tore him up.

What is the detail that doesnt look good for Adnan? ›

We also learn a detail that “doesn't look good for Adnan,” which is that some of their friends recall Adnan asking Hae for a ride, even though Adnan claims he didn't ask her for a ride. And, damningly, on the day of Hae's disappearance, Adnan told the cops that he was supposed to get a ride with Hae.

How old was Adnan Syed in 1999? ›

Baltimore court overturns Adnan Syed's prison sentence Syed was 18 when he was sentenced to life in prison for the murder of his ex-girlfriend Hae Min Lee. Lee was murdered in 1999 when she was also 18.

Who is Mr S in serial? ›

'MR S' Another person the podcast mentioned is the man who found Lee's body, only identified in the series as "Mr. S." Mr S, now publicly identified as Alonzo Sellers, said he found Lee's body after stopping to urinate in Leakin Park, which podcast host Sarah Koenig depicted as suspicious.

Where can I watch Adnan Syed documentary? ›

The Case Against Adnan Syed, a documentary series starring Rabia Chaudry, Saad Chaudry, and Shamim Rahman is available to stream now. Watch it on HBO Max, Spectrum TV, Vudu, Prime Video or Apple TV on your Roku device.

Where was Adnan born? ›

Poet, short story writer, essayist, and artist Etel Adnan was born in Beirut in 1925 to a Syrian Muslim father and a Greek Christian mother. Adnan grew up among the landscapes of Lebanon and Syria before moving to France for a time, and then to America.

How is Rabia related to Adnan? ›

Family friend of Adnan Syed, subject of the podcast Serial (2014), Chaudry subsequently wrote a book about his case called Adnan's Story: The Search for Truth and Justice After Serial (2016), which became a New York Times best seller. Chaudry co-hosts Undisclosed, a podcast on Syed's case and others.

Who is the host of Serial podcast? ›

Sarah Koenig, the Host of 'Serial,' Talks About Adnan Syed's Release - The New York Times.

What are some inconsistencies in Jay's story? ›

  • Version 1: Jay is the “criminal element of Woodlawn.” Version 2: Jay is “perceived” to be a criminal, but he's really not. ...
  • Version 1: They went to Westview Mall to go shopping. ...
  • Version 1: Jay and Adnan both smoke in Adnan's car in the evening. ...
  • Inconsistency #4. ...
  • Version 1: Jay didn't help bury the body.

What happened to Christina Gutierrez? ›

According to her son Roberto, Gutierrez had begun experiencing the effects of MS in 1999, complicated by diabetes. She started to lose her vision and memory. By 2003, she was using a wheelchair and couldn't remember her son's name. She died on January 30, 2004, in Towson, Maryland, after having a heart attack.

What do we learn about Adnan's lawyer? ›

Adnan's trial lawyer was M. Cristina Gutierrez, a renowned defense attorney in Maryland – tough and savvy and smart. Other lawyers said she was exactly the kind of person you'd want defending you on a first-degree murder charge. But Adnan was convicted, and a year later, Gutierrez was disbarred. What happened?

How did Ms Gutierrez handle Adnan's case? ›

She was disbarred by consent.

Gutierrez was reportedly "disbarred by consent" in May 2001, and none of the negligent client claims were investigated because she willingly signed the disbarment.

What was the very first podcast? ›

In 1993, the early days of Internet radio, Carl Malamud launched Internet Talk Radio which was the "first computer-radio talk show, each week interviewing a computer expert". It was distributed "as audio files that computer users fetch one by one".

Are Serial podcasts true? ›

Serial tells one story — a true story — over the course of a season. Serial has won every major award for broadcasting, including the duPont-Columbia, Scripps Howard, Edward R. Murrow, and the first-ever Peabody awarded to a podcast. Serial, like This American Life, is produced in collaboration with WBEZ Chicago.

Who is Sarah in Serial? ›

Sarah Koeing, born on July 9, 1969, is a a US journalist and podcaster from New York. She is best known for her award-winning podcast Serial, which was the fastest podcast in history to receive five million downloads, according to iTunes at the time.

Is Justin Brown still Adnan Syed's lawyer? ›

Representation of Adnan Syed

He currently resides in North Branch Correctional Institution in Cumberland, Maryland. Brown started representing Syed in 2009 and has been his lead attorney ever since.

Is Adnan Syed free? ›

Adnan had been out of prison, on home detention, since September 19, when a judge granted the state's motion to vacate his conviction.

What happened undisclosed podcast? ›

The podcast released its final episode in March of 2022.

Who is Adnan Syed's lawyer? ›

It's Midday on the Law. On Monday, Adnan Syed was released from prison and allowed to go home, with a GPS monitor, after 23 years behind bars. His conviction for murdering Hae-Min Lee in 1999 was vacated.

What happened to Cristina Gutierrez? ›

According to her son Roberto, Gutierrez had begun experiencing the effects of MS in 1999, complicated by diabetes. She started to lose her vision and memory. By 2003, she was using a wheelchair and couldn't remember her son's name. She died on January 30, 2004, in Towson, Maryland, after having a heart attack.

What is the status of Adnan Syed case? ›

Baltimore prosecutors on Tuesday dropped the charges against Adnan Syed, who was released from prison last month after he spent 23 years in prison fighting a murder conviction that was chronicled in the hit podcast “Serial.”

Who is Adnan's mother? ›

How old was Adnan Syed in 1999? ›

Baltimore court overturns Adnan Syed's prison sentence Syed was 18 when he was sentenced to life in prison for the murder of his ex-girlfriend Hae Min Lee. Lee was murdered in 1999 when she was also 18.

Who is Mr S in Serial? ›

'MR S' Another person the podcast mentioned is the man who found Lee's body, only identified in the series as "Mr. S." Mr S, now publicly identified as Alonzo Sellers, said he found Lee's body after stopping to urinate in Leakin Park, which podcast host Sarah Koenig depicted as suspicious.

Where can I listen to undisclosed podcast? ›

Undisclosed
  • Apple Podcasts.
  • Google Podcasts.
  • CastBox.
  • Deezer.
  • iHeart.
  • Stitcher.
  • TuneIn.

Who hosts undisclosed podcast? ›

The program is hosted by three lawyers Rabia Chaudry, Susan Simpson and Colin Miller.

What do we learn about Adnan's lawyer? ›

Adnan's trial lawyer was M. Cristina Gutierrez, a renowned defense attorney in Maryland – tough and savvy and smart. Other lawyers said she was exactly the kind of person you'd want defending you on a first-degree murder charge. But Adnan was convicted, and a year later, Gutierrez was disbarred. What happened?

How did Ms Gutierrez handle Adnan's case? ›

She was disbarred by consent.

Gutierrez was reportedly "disbarred by consent" in May 2001, and none of the negligent client claims were investigated because she willingly signed the disbarment.

What did Adnan think about his lawyer? ›

He liked her as a person, but thought she was a terrible lawyer. He thought she was bribed by somebody to purposely lose the case.

Videos

1. Adnan Syed Freed After 23 Years in Prison. Same Flaws in His Murder Case Plague Thousands of Others
(Democracy Now!)
2. Adnan Syed’s release after 23 years in prison: “We didn’t know what to expect” | FOX 5 DC
(FOX 5 Washington DC)
3. 'Serial's' Adnan Syed Freed From Prison After 23 Years
(Access)
4. Adnan Syed's attorney talks about his release what it says about criminal justice system
(PBS NewsHour)
5. Adnan Syed’s murder conviction vacated after 23 years in prison l GMA
(Good Morning America)
6. Judge orders Adnan Syed to be released from prison
(WJZ)
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